PRESS - ABSURD PERSON SINGULAR


ABSURD PERSON SINGULAR
by Alan Ayckbourn
directed by David Emmes
September 7 - October 7, 2012

Segerstrom Stage

He’s back! England’s most prolific and most ingenious playwright—and one of SCR’s most popular—outdoes himself this time by setting a party in the living room but keeping the drama in the kitchen. Three kitchens, in fact, on three successive Christmas Eves when relationships change, fortunes soar and then dive and the social kaleidoscope gets all shook up. Add an off-stage couple whose jokes are really bad, some of the most ingenious failed suicide attempts ever devised and lots of gin, and you’ve got a ferociously funny farce with very sharp teeth. Take a bite!

Photos

Click on photos for 300 dpi versions.

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Tessa Auberjonois and Colette Kilroy in South Coast Repertory's 2012 production of Absurd Person Singular by Alan Ayckbourn. Photo by Henry DiRocco/SCR.

  
Robert Curtis Brown, Kathleen Early and JD Cullum in South Coast Repertory's 2012 production of Absurd Person Singular by Alan Ayckbourn. Photo by Henry DiRocco/SCR.

   

Robert Curtis Brown, JD Cullum and Alan Smyth in South Coast Repertory's 2012 production of Absurd Person Singular by Alan Ayckbourn. Photo by Henry DiRocco/SCR.

  
Tessa Auberjonois and Alan Smyth in South Coast Repertory's 2012 production of Absurd Person Singular by Alan Ayckbourn. Photo by Henry DiRocco/SCR.

   

JD Cullum and Kathleen Early in South Coast Repertory's 2012 production of Absurd Person Singular by Alan Ayckbourn. Photo by Henry DiRocco/SCR.

  
Tessa Auberjonois and Alan Smyth in South Coast Repertory's 2012 production of Absurd Person Singular by Alan Ayckbourn. Photo by Henry DiRocco/SCR.

Kathleen Early, Tessa Auberjonois, Robert Curtis Brown, Colette Kilroy and JD Cullum in South Coast Repertory's 2012 production ofAbsurd Person Singular by Alan Ayckbourn. Photo by Henry DiRocco/SCR.


   
Kathleen Early and JD Cullum in South Coast Repertory's 2012 production of Absurd Person Singular by Alan Ayckbourn. Photo by Henry DiRocco/SCR.
  
Colette Kilroy and Robert Curtis Brown in South Coast Repertory's 2012 production of Absurd Person Singular by Alan Ayckbourn. Photo by Henry DiRocco/SCR.

       
Absurd Person Singular logo courtesy of South Coast Repertory.
  
Absurd Person Singular logo courtesy of South Coast Repertory.
  
Absurd Person Singular logo courtesy of South Coast Repertory.

Playwright Alan Ayckbourn.  Photo by John Thaxter.

Playwright

Alan Ayckbourn is one of Britain’s most performed playwrights, and has, to date, written 75 plays. Almost all received their first performance at the Stephen Joseph, with more than 35 of his works being subsequently staged in the West End, at the National Theatre or by the Royal Shakespeare Company. Major successes include Relatively Speaking, How the Other Half Loves, Absurd Person Singular, Bedroom Farce, A Chorus of Disapproval, A Small Family Business, Henceforward…, Comic Potential, Things We Do For Love and House & Garden. In 2009, Matthew Warchus’ hit in-the-round production of The Norman Conquests first seen at the Old Vic transferred to Broadway, earning a Tony for Best Revival of a Play. Christmas 2010 saw the National Theatre’s staging of his 1980 play Season’s Greetings to great acclaim and in January of 2012 a revival of Absent Friends began at the West End’s Harold Pinter Theatre. Although he stepped down as Artistic Director of the Stephen Joseph Theatre in 2009, a post he held for 37 years, he continues to guest direct there; last year saw Dear Uncle (his adaptation of Uncle Vanya) and Neighbourhood Watch. His plays have been translated into 35 languages, won numerous awards nationally and internationally, and have been performed worldwide on stage and television. In recent years, he has been inducted into American Theatre's Hall of Fame, received the 2010 Critics' Circle Award for Services to the Arts and became the first British playwright to receive both Olivier and Tony Special Lifetime Achievement Awards.  He was knighted in 1997 for services to the theatre.