PRESS - THE BORROWERS


THE BORROWERS
by Mary Norton
adapted for the stage by Charles Way
directed by Shelley Butler
February 10-26, 2012
Theatre for Young Audiences
Julianne Argyros Stage

In this enchanting new play based on an award-winning classic of children's literature, Arrietty lives a quiet life with her parents in a warm and cozy home. But, like any fourteen-year-old girl, she longs for the big wide world. And that world is really enormous for Arrietty because she's only four inches tall, and home is beneath the floorboards with scary “human beans” living just above. One day she's allowed to go above to “borrow” a few necessities and meets a human boy. But when he accidentally reveals their hiding place, her little family has to flee to the great outdoors, where she sees her first sunrise, gets surprised by a crow and spends the night in a shoe. Arrietty's adventure has begun!

PhotosClick on photos for 300 dpi versions.

   
Nicholas Mongiardo-Cooper and Wyatt Fenner in SCR's Theatre for Young Audiences production of The Borrowers by Mary Norton, adapted for the stage by Charles Way. Photo by Henry DiRocco/SCR.
  
Wyatt Fenner and Kalie Quiñones in SCR's Theatre for Young Audiences production ofThe Borrowers by Mary Norton, adapted for the stage by Charles Way. Photo by Henry DiRocco/SCR.

   
Amelia White and Peter Howard in SCR's Theatre for Young Audiences production ofThe Borrowers by Mary Norton, adapted for the stage by Charles Way. Photo by Henry DiRocco/SCR.
  
Nicholas Mongiardo-Cooper and Jennifer Parsons in SCR's Theatre for Young Audiences production of The Borrowers by Mary Norton, adapted for the stage by Charles Way. Photo by Henry DiRocco/SCR.

       
Kalie Quiñones in SCR's Theatre for Young Audiences production of The Borrowersby Mary Norton, adapted for the stage by Charles Way. Photo by Ben Horak/SCR.
  
Peter Howard in SCR's Theatre for Young Audiences production of The Borrowersby Mary Norton, adapted for the stage by Charles Way. Photo by Henry DiRocco/SCR.
  
Kalie Quiñones, Peter Howard and Amelia White in SCR's Theatre for Young Audiences production of The Borrowersby Mary Norton, adapted for the stage by Charles Way. Photo by Henry DiRocco/SCR.

   
The Borrowers logo courtesy of South Coast Repertory.
  
The Borrowers logo courtesy of South Coast Repertory.

Playwright Bio

Mary Norton (author) wrote only eight novels in a career that extended from 1943 to 1982, and yet she is rightfully considered one of the major mid-century British children's authors. The Borrowers (1952), winner of the distinguished Carnegie Medal, quickly assumed status as a classic. The five sequels to that book developed what critic Gillian Avery called "a powerful mythology." Are All the Giants Dead (1975) offered an ingenious contrast to the author's previous works. From the time of the appearance of her first novel, The Magic Bed-Knob: or, How to Become a Witch in Ten Easy Lessons (1943), Norton demonstrated a superb fusion of what T. S. Eliot called "tradition and the individual talent." She combined elements of her own experiences, transformed to meet the needs of her fantasies, with recognizable aspects of genres popular in British children's fiction of the first half of the twentieth century to create narratives that still maintain their freshness, originality and vitality.

Charles Way (playwright) has written more than 40 plays, many of them for young people, and his works have been produced all over the world. These include Sleeping Beauty, The Search for Odysseus and A Spell of Cold Weather, which were all nominated as Best Children's Play by the Writer's Guild of Great Britain. Other plays include The Flood, Red Red Shoes, One Snowy Night, The Tinderbox and The Night Before Christmas. He was commissioned by the National Theatre to write Alice in the News, which children all over Britain have performed. He has won several awards and was the recipient of the "Children's award" given by the Arts Council of England for Red Red Shoes as best play for young people 2004. His play Merlin and the Cave of Dreams, for Imagination Stage, was nominated for a Helen Hayes award for the Outstanding New Play of 2004. Plays for adults include a version of Bruce Chatwin's On the Black Hill and an adaptation of Independent People by Halldor Laxness. Recent new plays include Still Life, The Long Way Home and The Dutiful Daughter.